4.29.2021

News

Iceland’s self-image 

Artworks by Þórdís Elva Þorvaldsdóttir, Jón Gunnar Árnason, Guðmundur R. Lúðvíksson og Haraldur Jónasson.

Four artworks by four Icelandic artists will be showcased. The artworks are very different in terms of ideology, approach, and use of materials. They represent the self-reflections of Icelanders and raise questions about our identity.

Writer, lecturer, and playwright Þórdís Elva Þorvaldsdóttir published the poem Fjallkonan in 2017. Þórdís has received numerous awards for her fight against gender-based violence.

One significant artist of the 20th century is Jón Gunnar Árnason, who has not been afraid to tread new paths in his artistic endeavors, showcasing quite diverse works. In 1983, Jón Gunnar made a sculpture with an Icelandic pastry. 

In 1997, the visual artist Guðmundur R. Lúðvíksson created the work Ísland - sækjum það heim. The work consists of four photographs combined on one canvas.

The photojournalist Haraldur Jónasson managed to capture a moment when the US Defense Forces tried to prevent Dagur B. Eggertsson from attending a meeting at Höfði.

Iceland’s self-image is a self-examination through different works and media. The exhibition presents different perspectives on us, Icelanders, as a nation. Questions arise about who we are as Icelanders, how we perceive ourselves, and how others could possibly see us.

Are we the erupting volcano? Are we defined by homemade pastries? Are we drunk, vomiting, beaten, and destroyed? Are we simple and childish, because we feel comfortable cycling to work regardless of which social class we belong to? 

The exhibition is held in Völvufell 13-21, 111 Reykjavík, Friday, April 30th, and Saturday, May, 1st 2021. 

Opening hours are 14:00 - 17:00.

Iceland’s self-image is a final project by two Master's students from a curating course at the University of Iceland. The students are Berta Dröfn Ómarsdóttir and Þórdís Jóhanna Lareau.

Curators:

Berta Dröfn Ómarsdóttir and Þórdís Jóhanna Lareau.

Special thanks:
Guðmundur R. Lúðvíksson
Þórdís Elva Þorvaldsdóttir
Haraldur Jónasson
Hlynur Helgason
Birkir Karlsson
The Living Art Museum
University of Iceland

Iceland’s self-image 

Artworks by Þórdís Elva Þorvaldsdóttir, Jón Gunnar Árnason, Guðmundur R. Lúðvíksson og Haraldur Jónasson.

Four artworks by four Icelandic artists will be showcased. The artworks are very different in terms of ideology, approach, and use of materials. They represent the self-reflections of Icelanders and raise questions about our identity.

Writer, lecturer, and playwright Þórdís Elva Þorvaldsdóttir published the poem Fjallkonan in 2017. Þórdís has received numerous awards for her fight against gender-based violence.

One significant artist of the 20th century is Jón Gunnar Árnason, who has not been afraid to tread new paths in his artistic endeavors, showcasing quite diverse works. In 1983, Jón Gunnar made a sculpture with an Icelandic pastry. 

In 1997, the visual artist Guðmundur R. Lúðvíksson created the work Ísland - sækjum það heim. The work consists of four photographs combined on one canvas.

The photojournalist Haraldur Jónasson managed to capture a moment when the US Defense Forces tried to prevent Dagur B. Eggertsson from attending a meeting at Höfði.

Iceland’s self-image is a self-examination through different works and media. The exhibition presents different perspectives on us, Icelanders, as a nation. Questions arise about who we are as Icelanders, how we perceive ourselves, and how others could possibly see us.

Are we the erupting volcano? Are we defined by homemade pastries? Are we drunk, vomiting, beaten, and destroyed? Are we simple and childish, because we feel comfortable cycling to work regardless of which social class we belong to? 

The exhibition is held in Völvufell 13-21, 111 Reykjavík, Friday, April 30th, and Saturday, May, 1st 2021. 

Opening hours are 14:00 - 17:00.

Iceland’s self-image is a final project by two Master's students from a curating course at the University of Iceland. The students are Berta Dröfn Ómarsdóttir and Þórdís Jóhanna Lareau.

Curators:

Berta Dröfn Ómarsdóttir and Þórdís Jóhanna Lareau.

Special thanks:
Guðmundur R. Lúðvíksson
Þórdís Elva Þorvaldsdóttir
Haraldur Jónasson
Hlynur Helgason
Birkir Karlsson
The Living Art Museum
University of Iceland