Author Archive

Open call for proposals

Dec 05 2017 Published by under Uncategorized

The board of The Living Art Museum invites proposals for work to be exhibited in a group exhibition held on the occasion of the museum’s 40th anniversary.

The exhibition will open in June 2018 and continue throughout the summer.

5 – 6 successful proposals in total will be selected by the board from the submissions, with special attention given to applications that address contemporary issues and current events. Applicants with five years of practice or less are especially encouraged to apply. MA students and prospective BA graduates of 2018 are also welcome to submit proposals.

The board and staff of The Living Art Museum will provide the selected proposals with a small honorarium for material and production, an exhibition fee, installation assistance, design and printing of exhibition material, promotion, documentation and opening.

The exhibition will bring the selected proposals together with certain works from the collection of The Living Art Museum, spanning different periods and decades.

The Living Art Museum (Nýló) is a non-profit, artist-run museum and venue for contemporary art. The board of Nýló is committed to promoting critical discourse, progressive practice and experimental work in the field of contemporary art, to collecting and preserving work by artists who exhibit in the museum, and documents relating to the history of art, with focus on artist initiatives and performance art in Iceland.

Application deadline is January 15, 2018 at 12 o’clock midnight.

Submissions must include, in the following order:
1. Artwork proposal and detailed description of technical and installation requirements (max. 600 words)
2. Budget plan for the work proposed
3. Current CV (max. 2 pgs)
4. Support material / images (max. 6). All material must be labeled clearly with title, year, medium and dimensions

Proposal, CV, budget and image list should be submitted together as a single PDF attachment, no larger than 10 MB. Support material may be submitted separately in another attachment. Microsoft Word documents and submission text in the body of email correspondence will not be accepted.

For sound, video or time-based submissions, we ask that you please include a direct link to the content via your website or host page (Vimeo, etc.). Please do not include video files in your email application, we will only accept links to this material.

Please send your proposals to applications(at)nylo.is by midnight on January 15, 2018 with the subject line Nýló for 40 years.

The board of The Living Art Museum reserves the right to final decisions in accepting and declining proposals without further explanation. All applications must be submitted on the deadline via email. Hardcopies will not be accepted.

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NÝLÓ ART BINGO

Nov 29 2017 Published by under Uncategorized

The Living Art Museum invites you to NÝLÓ ART BINGO, Saturday December 16th between 4pm – 6pm at The Marshall House.

Prizes include more than 25 artworks by great artists!

The event will be that day only, starting at 4pm, on the dot, doors open at 3:30pm.

BINGO CARDS can be reserved in advance through nylo(at)nylo.is or purchased at the door before and during the event.

A special BONUS ROUND will be available to those who buy two or more bingo cards.

Important informations:
Please take note that there will be 5 rounds. Each round will take approximately 20 minutes and the same bingo card will be valid during all rounds.

BINGO CARD PRICES:
1 BINGO CARD – 3.900 KR
2 BINGO CARDS – 7.500 KR
3 BINGO CARDS – 10.000 KR

Artists contributing this year:
Anna Líndal
Arnar Ásgeirsson
Ásta Ólafsdóttir
Auður Lóa Guðnadóttir
Bára Bjarnadóttir
Bjarki Bragason
Claudia Hausfeld
Eva Ísleifsdóttir
Hildigunnur Birgisdóttir
Hrafnhildur Helgadóttir
Hreinn Friðfinnsson
Ívar Glói Gunnarsson
Jeannette Castioni
Kristín Dóra Ólafsdóttir
Kristín Rúnarsdóttir
Kristján Steingrímur
Libia Castro & Ólafur Ólafsson
Logi Leó Gunnarsson
Páll Haukur Björnsson
Ragna Róbertsdóttir
Rakel McMahon
Rebecca Erin Moran
Sigurður Atli Sigurðsson
Sigurður Ámundason
Steinunn Eldflaug Harðardóttir
Una Margrét Árnadóttir
Þorgerður Ólafsdóttir
Þóranna Björnsdóttir
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Moving Off the Land / Joan Jonas & María Huld Markan in Tjarnarbíó Cinema

Oct 01 2017 Published by under Uncategorized

Sequences proudly introduces a special experimental lecture and performance by honorary artist Joan Jonas in collaboration with Icelandic composer María Huld Markan.

The event will be held at Tjarnarbíó on October 8th at 8 p.m. Ticket sales are to be found at www.tix.is

Joan Jonas is the honorary artist of Sequences VIII, now in its eighth edition, taking place all over Reykjavík.

In addition to her performance at Tjarnarbíó Jonas will open Does the Mirror Make the Picture, an extensive exhibition of her work from various time periods.

Jonas’ exhibition at The Living Art Museum opens on October 6th, the first day of the festival and is open until December 10th 2017.

Jonas (b.1936 New York) is a pioneering video artist. Since the 1960’s she has created groundbreaking multidisciplinary works that investigate time-based structures and the politics of spectatorship. Her projects often simultaneously incorporate elements of theater, dance, sound, text, drawing, sculpture, and video projection. In newer videoworks, performances and installations Jonas has sought out collaborations with musicians and dancers, in addition to drawing from literary sources and mythic tales in realizing her multi-layered explorations.

María Huld Markan Sigfúsdóttir (b. 1980) is a composer and a violinist. She graduated as a violinist from the Reykjavik College of Music in 2000 and with a Bachelor’s degree in composition at the Iceland Academy of the Arts in 2007. As well as composing her own music, María has for the past decade performed music around the world with her band, amiina, as well as recorded and collaborated with a range of other bands and artists

Sequences is a ten day biennale held in Reykjavík on 6.-15. October 2017. The aim of Sequences aims to produce and present progressive visual art with a special focus on time-based mediums such as performance, sonic works, video, and public interventions.

Curator of Sequences VIII is Margot Norton, curator at the New Museum in New York and will the festival provide an outstanding array of offerings by various artists and musicians.

To learn more about the festival and its program, visit www.sequences.is

Courtesy the artist and Gavin Brown’s Enterprise, New York/Rome

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Music and Reading on the Magic Mountain

Sep 20 2017 Published by under Uncategorized

The Expedition to the Magic Mountain welcomes you to the third and last evening-wake in The Living Art Museum, Music and reading on the Magic Mountain, September 21st at 8pm.

Readers:
Brynja Cortes Andrésdóttir
Eiríkur Guðmundsson
Laufey Jensdóttir
Sturla Sigurðarson
Þórhallur Eyþórsson

&

Composers:
J. S. Bach [1685- 1750]
M. de Falla [1876- 1946]
F. Schubert [1797- 1828]
G. Verdi [1813- 1901]
R. Wagner [1813- 1883]

The Expedition to the Magic Mountain (2013-2020)* is an experiment with time and space, exploring levels of consciousness, knowledge and sensibility, old and new. We want to go beyond the borders of self-assumed existential conditions, and at the same time we have to acknowledge and face past and present forces of creativity and destruction.

We approach them through art, literature, conversation, action. We leave the stage and at the same time remain, seeking, to be found within and without. We sense the project as a conception and birth of a single, fractured mind, individual works merge and flow together in collective, temporary spaces of experience. We excavate the wasteland of consumers, consumed with endless shortage and craving for more, when nothing more is to be had.

In conjunction with the exhibition, the Expedition welcomes you to three evening wakes:

Thursday September 7th, 8 pm – The Artist as a Medium.
Thursday September 14th, 8pm – Cartography and Translations.
Thursday September 21st, 8pm – Music from the Magic Mountain.

*Members of the expedition are Ása Helga Hjörleifsdóttir, Birna Bjarnadóttir, Gauti Kristmannsson, Haraldur Jónsson, Karlotta Blöndal, Steingrímur Eyfjörd and Unnar Örn Auðarson.

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Cartography & Translations

Sep 12 2017 Published by under Uncategorized

The Expedition to the Magic Mountain welcomes you to the second evening-wake in The Living Art Museum, Cartography and Translations, September 14th at 8pm.

Haraldur Erlendsson – discusses the evening’s topics
&
Max Frisch [1911- 1991] – Der Mensch erscheint im Holozän / Man in the Holocene

Translation and Reader : Jón Bjarni Atlason

The Expedition to the Magic Mountain (2013-2020)* is an experiment with time and space, exploring levels of consciousness, knowledge and sensibility, old and new. We want to go beyond the borders of self-assumed existential conditions, and at the same time we have to acknowledge and face past and present forces of creativity and destruction.

We approach them through art, literature, conversation, action. We leave the stage and at the same time remain, seeking, to be found within and without. We sense the project as a conception and birth of a single, fractured mind, individual works merge and flow together in collective, temporary spaces of experience. We excavate the wasteland of consumers, consumed with endless shortage and craving for more, when nothing more is to be had.

In conjunction with the exhibition, the Expedition welcomes you to three evening wakes:

Thursday September 7th, 8 pm – The Artist as a Medium.
Thursday September 14th, 8pm – Cartography and Translations.
Thursday September 21st, 8pm – Music from the Magic Mountain.

*Members of the expedition are Ása Helga Hjörleifsdóttir, Birna Bjarnadóttir, Gauti Kristmannsson, Haraldur Jónsson, Karlotta Blöndal, Steingrímur Eyfjörd and Unnar Örn Auðarson.

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The Artist as a Medium

Sep 04 2017 Published by under Uncategorized

The Expedition to the Magic Mountain welcomes you to the first evening-wake in The Living Art Museum, The artist as a Medium, September 7th at 8pm.

Gísli Magnússon – discusses the evening’s topics
and
Edith Södergran [1892- 1923] – The Country that does not exists…

Readers: Soffía Bjarnadóttir / Marloes Antje Robijn
Translation: Njörður P. Njarðvík

The Expedition to the Magic Mountain (2013-2020)* is an experiment with time and space, exploring levels of consciousness, knowledge and sensibility, old and new. We want to go beyond the borders of self-assumed existential conditions, and at the same time we have to acknowledge and face past and present forces of creativity and destruction.

We approach them through art, literature, conversation, action. We leave the stage and at the same time remain, seeking, to be found within and without. We sense the project as a conception and birth of a single, fractured mind, individual works merge and flow together in collective, temporary spaces of experience. We excavate the wasteland of consumers, consumed with endless shortage and craving for more, when nothing more is to be had.

In conjunction with the exhibition, the Expedition welcomes you to the following events:

Thursday September 7th, 8 pm – The Artist as a Medium.

Thursday September 14th, 8pm – Cartography and Translations.

Thursday September 21st, 8pm – Music from the Magic Mountain.

*Members of the expedition are Ása Helga Hjörleifsdóttir, Birna Bjarnadóttir, Gauti Kristmannsson, Haraldur Jónsson, Karlotta Blöndal, Steingrímur Eyfjörd and Unnar Örn Auðarson.

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Joan Jonas, Sequences VIII Honorary Artist’s debut in The Living Art Museum

Aug 29 2017 Published by under Uncategorized

Sequences VIII

Sequences opens its ten-day biennial in Reykjavik, Iceland, on October 6, 2017 and proudly presents the work of twenty-one local and international artists and honorary artist Joan Jonas in this eighth edition.

An offspring of the dynamic art scene that thrives in Reykjavík, Sequences Real Time Art Festival is an independent biennial that aims to produce and present progressive visual art with a special focus on time-based mediums such as performance, sonic works, video, and public interventions. Sequences VIII features a selection of artists and performers, many of whom engage in cross-disciplinary collaboration.

The hub of Sequences VIII will be the newly opened Marshall House, home to the artist-run spaces The Living Art Museum and Kling & Bang. The festival will also take place in other artist-run and publicly funded locations throughout Reykjavik. A blossoming off-venue program will be presented alongside the curated program

Margot Norton, curator at the New Museum in New York, is the curator of Sequences VIII.

“Elastic Hours”

While Sequences uses the term “real time” to refer to time-based media, “Sequences VIII: Elastic Hours” considers how the term might be applied to the experience of art making, exploring how artists manipulate time as a raw material. Stretching, echoing, and inverting hours, the works included in Sequences VIII often go beyond standardized metrics such as clocks to investigate alternative systems for measuring and experiencing time. These works remind us that our daily rhythms are not solely determined by tradition and locality but also rooted in the natural forces, beyond our control.

The passage of time is acutely palpable in Iceland in particular, as with the region’s seasonal extremes in the duration of daylight hours and mercurial weather conditions. In charting the passage of time through unconventional means, the artists included bring heightened awareness and critical insights into our relationships with objects, society, and the universe around us.

Honorary artist: Joan Jonas

Since the late 1960s, Joan Jonas (b. 1936 New York. Lives and works in New York) has created groundbreaking multidisciplinary works that investigate time-based structures and the politics of spectatorship.

Her projects often simultaneously incorporate elements of theater, dance, sound, text, drawing, sculpture, and video projection. They rely on alternate identities, narrative symbols and threads, but they also refuse linearity, privileging instead the doubled and fractured tale.

A pioneer of video art, Jonas began using the Portapak video system in 1970 to explore the shifts that occur from the camera to the projection to the body and the space of the live action. For her recent videos, performances, and installations, Jonas has frequently collaborated with musicians and dancers and has drawn from literary sources and mythic tales in realizing her multi-layered explorations.

For Sequences, Jonas will present a solo exhibition at The Living Art Museum, which will include a selection of works from throughout her career—from her early videos Wind (1968) and Song Delay (1973) to stream or river or flight or pattern (2016/2017), a project that she conceived on recent travels to Venice, Singapore, Nova Scotia, and Vietnam.

She will also present a performance at Tjarnarbíó on Sunday, October 8, featuring a new collaboration with Icelandic composer and musician María Huld Markan.

Image: Joan Jonas, Song Delay, 1973, film still. © 2017 Joan Jonas / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Organizers:
The Living Art Museum, Kling & Bang and the Icelandic Art Center are responsible for Sequences and this eighth edition is organized by a team including curator Margot Norton, producer Edda Kristín Sigurjónsdóttir and the board of Sequences.

Sponsors:
Sequences is made possible with support from Iceland Visual Arts Fund, City of Reykjavík, Promote Iceland, Iceland Naturally and the all-embracing and invigorating collaborative effort of artists.

Artists:

– Helena Aðalsteinsdóttir (b. 1990 Reykjavík. Lives and works in Amsterdam)

– Birgir Andrésson (b. 1955 Westman Islands, Iceland. d. 2007 Reykjavík)

– Hildigunnur Birgisdóttir (b. 1980 Reykjavík. Lives and works in Rvk)

– Ásgerður Birna Björnsdóttir (b. 1990 Reykjavík. Lives and works in Amsterdam)

– Elín Hansdóttir (b. 1980 Reykjavík. Lives and works in Reykjavík)

– David Horvitz (b. 1982 Los Angeles. Lives and works in Los Angeles) with Jófríður Ákadóttir (b. 1994 Reykjavík. Lives and works in Reykjavík)

– Anna K.E. (b. 1986, Tbilisi, Georgia. Lives and works in New York and Düsseldorf, Germany) and Florian Meisenberg (b. 1980, Berlin. Lives and works in New York and Düsseldorf, Germany)

– Alicja Kwade (b. 1979 Katowice, Poland. Lives and works in Berlin)

– Florence Lam (b. 1992, Vancouver, Canada. Lives and works in Reykjavík)

– Nancy Lupo (b. 1983 Flagstaff, Arizona. Lives and works in Los Angeles)

– Sara Magenheimer (b. 1981, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Lives and works in New York)

– Rebecca Erin Moran (b. 1976 Greeley, Colorado. Lives and works in Reykjavík)

– Eduardo Navarro (b. 1979 Buenos Aires, Argentina. Lives and works in Buenos Aires, Argentina)

– Ragnar Helgi Ólafsson (b. 1971 Reykjavík. Lives and works in Reykjavík)

– Roman Ondák (b. 1966 Žilina, Slovakia. Lives and works in Bratislava, Slovakia)

– Habbý Ósk (b. 1979 Akureyri, Iceland. Lives and works in New York)

– Agnieszka Polska (b. 1985, Lublin, Poland. Lives and works in Berlin)

– Aki Sasamoto (b. 1980 Yokohama, Japan. Lives and works in New York)

– Cally Spooner (b. 1983 Ascot, England. Lives and works in London and Athens, Greece)

– Una Sigtryggsdóttir (b. 1990, Reykjavik. Lives and works in Reykjavik)

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HAPPY PEOPLE – Last Smoking Lounge

Jul 26 2017 Published by under Uncategorized

HAPPY PEOPLE
A smoking lounge by Arnar Ásgeirsson

Let´s come together, let´s enjoy.
Let´s inhale, deep into our lungs.
Exhale into space, and then take a moment to contemplate.

We welcome you to Happy People’ s Thursdays Smoking Lounge for the fifth and last time, 27 July from 6 – 9 pm.

This Thursday visitors are invited to smoke artworks by Darri Lorenzen (IS), Gustav Wideberg (SE), Juan-pedro Fabra Guemberena (UY/SE), Yaima Carrazana (CU) & Yazan Khalili (PS).

SMOKING LOUNGE SCHEDULE
29 June – Hrafnhildur Helgadóttir (IS), Mehraneh Atashi (IR), Eggert Pétursson (IS), Loidys Carnero (CU), Hreinn Friðfinnsson (IS)
6 July – David Bernstein (US), Brynhildur Þorgeirsdóttir (IS), Geirþrúður Einarsdóttir (IS), ), Gylfi Sigurðsson (IS), Anna Hrund Másdóttir (IS), Guðmundur Thoroddsen (IS)
13 July – Lars TCF Holdhus (NO), Yosuke Amemiya (JP), Hildigunnur Birgisdóttir (IS) Žilvinas Landzbergas (LT), Eloise Bonneviot (FR)
20 July & 27 July – LAST SMOKING LOUNGE
Darri Lorenzen (IS), Gustav Wideberg (SE), Juan-pedro Fabra Guemberena (UY/SE), Yaima Carrazana (CU), Yazan Khalili (PS)

While the pipes are being fired up for the last time, three artists – Ásta Fanney Sigurðardóttir, Gunnar Gunnsteinsson and Steinunn Eldflaug Harðardóttir will take the stage and perform between 6 – 9 pm.

It’s the last exhibition week of Happy People – A smoking lounge offering a selection of objects and artwork that have been selected and created for you to interact with.

The exhibition is open until 30th July

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HAPPY PEOPLE – smoking lounges on Thursdays

Jun 28 2017 Published by under Uncategorized

HAPPY PEOPLE
A smoking lounge by Arnar Ásgeirsson

Let´s come together, let´s enjoy.
Let´s inhale, deep into our lungs.
Exhale into space, and then take a moment to contemplate.

The smoking lounge will be open between 6 – 9 pm on Thursdays throughout July

Graphic by Arnar Ásgeirsson & Michel Keppel.

SMOKING SCHEDULE
29 June – Hrafnhildur Helgadóttir (IS), Mehraneh Atashi (IR), Eggert Pétursson (IS), Loidys Carnero (CU), Hreinn Friðfinnsson (IS)
6 July – David Bernstein (US), Brynhildur Þorgeirsdóttir (IS), Geirþrúður Einarsdóttir (IS), ), Gylfi Sigurðsson (IS), Anna Hrund Másdóttir (IS), Guðmundur Thoroddsen (IS)
13 July – Lars TCF Holdhus (NO), Yosuke Amemiya (JP), Hildigunnur Birgisdóttir (IS) Žilvinas Landzbergas (LT), Eloise Bonneviot (FR)
20 July & 27 July – LAST SMOKING LOUNGE
Darri Lorenzen (IS), Gustav Wideberg (SE), Juan-pedro Fabra Guemberena (UY/SE), Yaima Carrazana (CU), Yazan Khalili (PS)

We welcome you to Happy People – A smoking lounge offering a selection of objects and artwork that have been selected and created for you to interact with.

Mysterious sculptures have been inserted in to funky pipes for you to smoke, consume and inhale fruity flavours. This smoking experience is an attempt for new ways to experience art.

During the exhibition, objects by participating artists will be picked out of the space, and inserted into pipes to be smoked, creating a flowing rotation. Each smoking ceremony will be supported by live acts and performances.

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Annual meeting 2017 – new board

Jun 07 2017 Published by under Uncategorized

The Living Art Museum‘s annual meeting was held on Tuesday, May 30th at 5:30 pm in the Marshall House.

Hildigunnur Birgisdóttir was moderator and Heiðar Kári Rannversson recorded minutes.

26 members took part in the meeting, including then current board members.

Eight new members were welcomed into the Association of The Living Art Museum including: Hildur Henrýsdóttir, Steinunn Marta Önnudóttir, Elín Þórhallsdóttir, Birkir Karlsson, Sam Reese, Bára Bjarnadóttir, Amanda Riffo and Marina Rees.

Elections were held for both primary board and alternate board positions.

Þorgerður Ólafsdóttir will continue as the director of the museum, with the newly elected primary board members Anna Líndal, Birkir Karlsson, Kristín Rúnarsdóttir and Sam Rees.

For the alternate board, Claudia Hausfeld and Þóranna Björnsdóttir were elected to continue, along with new member Bára Bjarnadóttir.

Board members from 2015 to 2017 included Þorgerður Ólafsdóttir (Director), Claudia Hausfeld, Logi Bjarnason, Rebecca Erin Moran and Þóranna Björnsdóttir.

Alternate board members from 2016 to 2017 were Kolbeinn Hugi Höskuldsson, Heiðar Kári
Rannversson and Sindri Leifsson.

The Living Art Museum would like to extend a big thank you to the all outgoing board members for their hard work during the past two years.

Both annual financial statements and reports can be found on our website.

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Rolling Line – Guided Tour on Whit Sunday

Jun 02 2017 Published by under Uncategorized

Guided tour around the exhibition Rolling Line

– Sunday 4h June, 4pm
– Nýlistasafnið, 2nd floor, The Marshall House
– Grandagarður 20, 101 RVK

The Living Art Museum will be open during the Whitsunday weekend.
In correlation with the release of the publication Án titils / Untitled, Þorgerður Ólafsdóttir, director of The Living Art Museum and co-curator of Rolling Line, will offer a guided tour of the exhibition on Whitsunday, June 4th from 4 to 4:30 pm.

The tour is free of charge.

Rolling Line spans more than a decade of work and documentation by artist Ólafur Lárusson (1951 – 2014).

Ólafur was a prolific artist and an active participant in the Icelandic art scene, which had come to a crossroad in the middle of the seventies; the same time his fascination with the camera had led him to bold experiments with the device as documentation, and also a platform to explore the boundaries of the medium. Ólafur was in the group of fellow art students who resigned from their studies at The Icelandic College of Arts and Crafts (MHÍ) in 1974 in a push against stasis and headed off to the Netherlands to pursue further education at the notable Atelier ´63 in Haarlem.

After graduating from the school in 1976, Ólafur moved home to Iceland the same year and accepted an invitation to teach in the Department in Transition (Deild í mótun), a new department at MHÍ later called the Living Art Department (Nýlistadeild), and where he would teach film making.

Ólafur was one of the founding members of The Living Art Museum and a significant contributor to the progress of performance in Iceland.

This is the first time that Ólafur´s works are presented together to this extent, an attempt to open up a comprehensive view of the artist’s most productive years.

The exhibition has gathered works from the collections of The Reykjavík Art Museum, The National Gallery of Iceland and The Icelandic Folk and Outsider Art Museum (Safnasafnið), amongst those in private collections and with Ólafur´s friends and contemporaries.

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The Living Art Museum releases the book Án titils / Untitled

May 26 2017 Published by under Uncategorized

Án titils / Untitled
Ólafur Lárusson

Edited by: Þorgerður Ólafsdóttir & Becky Forsythe
Design: Studio – Studio(Arnar Freyr Guðmundsson & Birna Geirfinnsdóttir)
Translation: Kolbrún Ýr Einarsdóttir, Becky Forsythe
Proofreading: Auður Aðalsteinsdóttir, Guðrún Inga Ragnarsdóttir, Elin Thordarson
Selection of photographs and material from the Ólafur Lárusson Archive: Þorgerður Ólafsdóttir & Becky Forsythe
Other documentation: Vigfús Birgisson, National Gallery of Iceland
Icelandic / English
pgs. 184
230 x 170 mm
Price: 4.900 ISK
Edition 700
©
The Living Art Museum
2017
ISBN 978-9935-24-167-2
Available
ORDER BOOK

On June 2nd The Living Art Museum will release Án titils / Untitled, a publication of the works, archival material and contributions made by artist Ólafur Lárusson (1951-2014), one of the museum’s founding members.

The book follows the exhibition Rolling Line, now occupying The Living Art Museum in the Marshall House until June 11th.

Án titils / Untitled includes a large selection of archive material from Ólafur´s studio, acquired by the museum last year as a gift on behalf of the artist by his family.

The book also includes an introductory text by Halldór Björn Runólfsson, and interviews with Ólafur´s friends and contemporaries, including Hreinn Friðfinnsson, Hildur Hákonardóttir, Kees Visser, Kristján Guðmundsson, Magnús Pálsson, Níels Hafstein, Rúrí, Sigurður Guðmundsson and Þór Vigfússon.

The artist´s own voice also comes through in fragments of interviews taken with Ólafur and closely connected to a chronology following the life of the artist.

This is the first time that a book is published on Ólafur Lárusson´s work.

The book is edited by Þorgerður Ólafsdóttir and Becky Forsythe, and designed by Studio – Studio, Arnar Freyr Guðmundsson and Birna Geirfinnsdóttir.

We hope that this publication and the exhibition Rolling Line, which span a decade of Ólafur´s practice, contribute to a better understanding of the artist and his work.

An artist’s archive is inevitably personal; an unedited history hidden away and tucked between the pages of an otherwise organized order of things. Unfinished or incomplete ideas hinting towards the ongoing process of creativity surface in the immediacy of the material and the mark of the artist´s accidental habits and gestures. Access to this intimate parallel allows our own imaginations to run wild in the freedom of Ólafur´s world. In the process it becomes possible to continue history by adding footnotes and rearrangement. The things left behind become moments anew. The past is pulled into the present. And the black and white recording is seen in colour again.

Wandering through the material has been a joint venture with the artist that has stood us alongside those audience members in 1978. The relevancy of his works and archival memory have enabled us to gaze upon Ólafur as he stood where the grass grew, or collaborated with the wild Arctic Terns. When he somersaulted “out and about in the mountains”, and buried his head under the moss-covered landscape, crashed through the glass, and rolled himself up in dandelions, paint and smoke with the dead-end rainbow. In his endless curiosity, sentimentality and unshakable romance with nature and his environment, his view through the lens, the ritualism, and his resonating lightness, humor and adventure. Sorting through the piles that assemble the Ólafur Lárusson Archive has been full of echoing black and white rainbows and moments of dust sparkles glittering gold in the passed and blazing sunlight.”

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Joi de vivre! The Living Art Museum loans works to The Icelandic Folk and Outsider Museum 2017

May 10 2017 Published by under Uncategorized

The Icelandic Folk and Outsider Art Museum opened anew after winter on Saturday May 13th at 2:00pm!

From May 14th to September 3rd, 2017 the museum will be open daily between 10:00 am – 5:00 pm.

The 2017 exhibition year will take place in collaboration with numerous artists, The Living Art Museum, Art Without Borders festival, Grenivík School, Álfaborg Preschool and Valsár School in Svalbarðseyri.

Among exhibitions this year is an installation of works by artist Dieter Roth, which looks into the childlike nature found in his work, antics, images he drew using both hands simultaneously and reviews his self-portraits. To shed light on this in some of the works, plaster animals by students in the youngest grade from Grenivík School are being presented alongside, and offer a continuation of the youthful tone that resonates for some in Dieter Roth´s works.

The exhibition presents works from the collection of The Icelandic Folk and Outsider Art Museum alongside 27 works on loan from The Living Art Museum.

The Icelandic Folk and Outsider Art Museum will host 10 exhibitions this year, with numerous artists including:

Aðalheiður Sigríður Eysteinsdóttir who will exhibit the work Flæðilína, which was done especially for the museum and dedicated to it’s founders. Birta Guðjónsdóttir will exhibit her work Táknskilningur and Harpa Björnsdóttir will exhibit the work FÓRN (SACRIFICE). Sigríður Ágústsdóttir and Ragnheiður Þóra Ragnarsdóttir´s exhibition is titled Vorlaukar and includes ceramicwork, painting and photography.

Matthías Rúnar Sigurðsson and Þorvaldur Jónsson are of the younger generation of artists and are both from Reykjavík. Their exhibition brings together sculptures from the Icelandic dolerite and colourful paintings on plywood.

In the reading room at The Icelandic Folk and Outsider Art Museum, work from the collection can currently be seen. Hulda Vilhjálmsdóttir exhibits paintings, drawings, bookworks and ceramics. In addition there are pictures by Erla Þórarinsdóttir, Bjargey Ingólfsdóttir and Hálfdán Björnsson.

The Icelandic Folk and Outsider Art Museum was founded in 1995 by Níels Hafstein and Magnhildur Sigurðardóttir and is located at Svalbarðsströnd in Eyjafjörður.

In the collection there is work after 323 self-taught and educated artists, in whole counting nearly 6000 artworks. Within the museum there is also a specific collection department, Kikó Korriró-stofa, where 120-130,000 works by Þórður Guðmundur Valdimarsson are preserved.

The Icelandic Folk and Outsider Art Museum is known within the art museums in Iceland to collect and exhibit work by outsider artists and educated artists equally and offers a wide range in the exhibitions held at the museum. Traditional folk art and progressive contemporary art are exhibited inclusively, with the goal of The Icelandic Folk and Outsider Art Museum focused on quality and sincerity.

Further information can be found on the museum´s website: www.safnasafnid.is
For further inquiries: 461-4066 / safngeymsla(at)simnet.is

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Rolling Line – Guided Tour on First Day of Summer

Apr 19 2017 Published by under Uncategorized

Guided tour around the exhibition Rolling Line

– Thursday 20th April, 8pm
– Nýlistasafnið, 2nd floor, The Marshall House
– Grandagarður 20, 101 RVK

The Living Art Museum cordially welcomes you to a guided tour of the exhibition Rolling Line, which opened on March 18th in the Marshall House, Grandagarður 20, 101 Reykjavík.

Þorgerður Ólafsdóttir, director of the Living Art Museum and co-curator of the exhibition Rolling Line, will offer a guided tour of the exhibition on Thursday, First Day of Summer, April 20th at 20:00.

The tour is free of charge.

Happy Hour at Marshall Restaurant & Bar until 9pm.

Rolling Line spans more than a decade of work and documentation by artist Ólafur Lárusson (1951 – 2014).

Ólafur was a prolific artist and an active participant in the Icelandic art scene, which had come to a crossroad in the middle of the seventies; the same time his fascination with the camera had led him to bold experiments with the device as documentation, and also a platform to explore the boundaries of the medium. Ólafur was in the group of fellow art students who resigned from their studies at The Icelandic College of Arts and Crafts (MHÍ) in 1974 in a push against stasis and headed off to the Netherlands to pursue further education at the notable Atelier ´63 in Haarlem.

After graduating from the school in 1976, Ólafur moved home to Iceland the same year and accepted an invitation to teach in the Department in Transition (Deild í mótun), a new department at MHÍ later called the Living Art Department (Nýlistadeild), and where he would teach film making.

Ólafur was one of the founding members of The Living Art Museum and a significant contributor to the progress of performance in Iceland.

This is the first time that Ólafur´s works are presented together to this extent, an attempt to open up a comprehensive view of the artist’s most productive years.

The exhibition has gathered works from the collections of The Reykjavík Art Museum, The National Gallery of Iceland and The Icelandic Folk and Outsider Art Museum (Safnasafnið), amongst those in private collections and with Ólafur´s friends and contemporaries.

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Videonight – Duncan Campbell, Rachel MacLean and Beagles & Ramsay

Apr 03 2017 Published by under Uncategorized

The Living Art Museum would like to invite you to a one night screening of works by Duncan Campbell, Rachel MacLean og Beagles & Ramsay, Thursday 6th april, between 8 – 9 pm. The artists John Beagles & Graham Ramsay will be present for the screening.

Against the backdrop of significant political change and uncertainty in the UK this screening will bring together three artists based in Scotland working with video. The various works in this show delve into aspects of politics and national identity, along with an exploration of individual and collective agency. Some are more direct interventions into historical and political discourses, whilst others operate in more allusive and oblique ways.

DUNCAN CAMPBELL works in many ways including constructing documentary-like narratives from archival footage. He often builds up profiles of significant public figures, while interspersing found film with material he shoots himself. In several of his films Campbell has investigated subjects and people closely associated with Northern Ireland and the country’s social and political history, revealing a side to the subject not commonly portrayed in the mainstream media.

Campbell’s 37-minute film Bernadette (2008) portrays socialist and former Northern Irish MP Bernadette Devlin during the 1960s and 1970s. When elected at the age of twenty-one, Devlin became the youngest female Member of Parliament ever to have been elected to Westminster. Campbell’s depiction of Devlin reveals the dynamics of documentary film making itself. He blurs fact and fiction and mixes archival and new footage to construct and unravel representations of his subject. Making use of the distance that the passage of time allows, he creates a portrait of Devlin that is free from the political partisanship that has surrounded many depictions of her.

In 2013 Campbell represented Scotland at the 55th Venice Biennale, and won the 2014 Turner Prize.

RACHEL MACLEAN
The supersaturated, candy-coloured worlds of Rachel Maclean’s films are created with the help of green screen technology. Populated by shifting, ghoulish characters – each one played by Maclean – they are inspired by fairytales, horror films and TV talent shows and offer a sharp critique of contemporary culture. For this show she would present The Lion and The Unicorn (12mins) 2012.

The Lion and The Unicorn is a short film inspired by the heraldic symbols found on the Royal Coat of Arms of the United Kingdom, the lion (representing England) and the unicorn (representing Scotland). The film uses these representations of both alliance and opposition to explore the myriad, convoluted and often contradictory constructions of cultural identity that make up the unstable definitions of what it means to be Scottish or part of the Union with England.

The video features three recurrent characters: the lion, the unicorn and the queen. These figures seem to emerge from disparate genres, including shadowy historical reconstruction, playful nursery rhyme and pragmatic TV interview. Inhabiting the rich historical setting of Traquair House in the Scottish Borders, they are seen drinking North-sea oil from Jacobite crystal, dividing up the pieces of a Union Jack cake and inciting conflict over the mispronunciation of Robert Burns.

Rachel Maclean will represent Scotland at the Venice Biennale in 2017.

BEAGLES & RAMSAY
Molar (5:35mins 2014) features a semi-tranquilised voice that appears to be suffering from a crumbling brain and slumped dentistry. As such the video shares similarities with earlier work where characters and objects ventriloquize social and cultural pathologies, and are implicated in the complex struggle to carve out a space for personal and political agency.

As with much of Beagles & Ramsay’s work the tone, timbre and content of the voice in Molar oscillates between the melancholic, reflective and intoxicated, to the manic and accusatory. The voice reflects something of the subjective experience of shifting between feelings of combativeness, impotence and complicity. Their interest in 3D animation comes from a long-standing engagement with popular forms as they aim to create works capable of communicating with a wide range of publics, and also because of a desire to explore how such forms can be defamiliarised with unconventional content.

John Beagles and Graham Ramsay have exhibited internationally at venues including the Venice Biennale; MoMA PS1, New York; the Migros Museum, Zurich; the New Museum of Contemporary Art, New York; the ICA, London; and the Rotterdam International Film Festival.

They have also curated numerous exhibitions over the past twenty years.

The event is open for all and free of charge.

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Sequences celebrates its 10 year Anniversary

Nov 15 2016 Published by under Uncategorized

Sequences – real time art festival celebrates its 10 year Anniversary Saturday November 19th in Reykjavík and welcomes everyone to the celebration.

The festivities begin at 12:45 in The National Gallery where Margot Norton, the newly appointed curator of the next festival, taking place in fall 2017, will give short remarks, introducing the theme of the next festival and announcing the Honorary Artist. She will also introduce David Horvitz’s piece Let Us Keep Our Own Noon that will be on view in The National Gallery until winter solstice on December 21st.

The work consists of forty-seven hand bells created through the remelting of a French church bell dating back to 1742. The work is activated by forty-seven performers who, at local noon, taking place at 13:13 on this day, collectively ring the bells and then disperse throughout the building and out onto the surrounding streets of the National Gallery. The board of Sequences invites all guests to enjoy a homemade birthday cake after the performance.

From there we move on to Mengi, performance venue on Óðinsgata 2 where Rebecca Moran shows a recent piece and an open sculpture tournament takes place and DJ Emotional (Ragnar Kjartansson) plays moods for listening and relaxation. Hildigunnur Birgisdóttir will host a show of .gif animations by various artists. The program finishes with the unveiling of DayBreak, Forever a sound installation by Ragnar Helgi Ólafsson, that will be on view until next Sequences festival, fall 2017.

While this day’s program celebrates the 10 year anniversary of Sequences, it also serves as a bridge to the next festival that will be held in October 2017. The artists showing their works are, for instance, all exhibiting in the next Sequences and the curator’s involvement testifies to her commitment and interest in creating strong connections to the Icelandic art scene and artists and in exploring the cultural life of the city before and leading up to Sequences VIII. The anniversary program can thus be said to be a prelude to the ten day festival to come.

Sequences is an independent biennial, established in Reykjavík in 2006. The aim of the ten-day festival is to produce and present progressive visual art with special focus on time-based mediums, such as performance, sonic works, video and public interventions. An offspring of the dynamic art scene that thrives in Reykjavik, Sequences is the first art festival in Iceland to focus on visual art alone. New artistic directors are hired to reshape each edition of Sequences according to their vision, making it unique and different every time.

Sequences is in the hands of the Living Art Museum, Kling & Bang gallery and the Icelandic Art Center.

The National Gallery is located on Fríkirkjuvegur 7 and Mengi’s address is Óðinsgata 2, 101 Reykjavík.

In conjunction with the anniversary David Horvitz will give a lecture on his works in the lecture hall of the Iceland Academy of the Arts (Laugarnesvegur 91) on Friday November 18 at 13:00. The lecture is open for all, admission is free.

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Curator for Sequences VIII announced and the festival celebrates 10 years

Oct 24 2016 Published by under Uncategorized

On the occasion of Sequences 10th anniversary, please join in a celebration from noon on November 19th in central Reykjavík.

The board of Sequences is happy to announce that Margot Norton, associate curator at the New Museum, will be the curator of Sequences VIII, that will be held in October 2017. Norton will be present and will introduce the honorary artist of Sequences VIII and give a glimpse into the upcoming festival. A few of the invited artists will have an appearance on the day of the celebration.

All are welcome, no entry fee just cake and cava!

Program to be announced shortly.

Margot Norton is Associate Curator at the New Museum in New York.

At the New Museum, she has curated and co-curated solo exhibitions with artists Judith Bernstein, Pia Camil, Sarah Charlesworth, Roberto Cuoghi, Tacita Dean, Ragnar Kjartansson, Chris Ofili, Goshka Macuga, Laure Prouvost, Anri Sala, and Erika Vogt, and group exhibitions “The Keeper,” “Here and Elsewhere,” and “NYC 1993: Experimental Jet Set, Trash and No Star.”

She also organized the retrospective exhibition “Llyn Foulkes,” which traveled from the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles, and worked on the exhibitions “Ghosts in the Machine,” “Chris Burden: Extreme Measures,” and “Jim Shaw: The End is Here.”

Norton curated “Night Transmissions: Electronic Intimacy,” a program of video art broadcast on RÚV, Icelandic National Broadcasting Service in early 2016.

Norton is currently working on the exhibition, “Pipilotti Rist: Pixel Forest,” on view at the New Museum October 26, 2016—January 15, 2017. Before she joined the New Museum, she was Curatorial Assistant on the 2010 Whitney Biennial and in the Drawings Department at the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York. Norton has lectured and published on contemporary art and holds a Master’s Degree in Curatorial Studies from Columbia University, New York.

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The Living Art Museum receives a large selection of material from the studio of artist Ólafur Lárusson (1951 – 2014)

Sep 10 2016 Published by under Uncategorized

Family of the late Ólafur Lárusson, have gifted the Living Art Museum a large portion of material, spanning two decades from around 1970 – 1990, gathered from Ólafur´s art studio. Amongst this donation is part of the artist´s personal library, his film collection, negatives, slides, photographs, sketches, VHS recordings performance documentation, exhibition catalogues and invitations, artistic research and experimentation, as well as proposals for works in the form of drawings, snapshots and conceptualizations that had never been fully realized.

The Living Art Museum will move their exhibition space to the newly renovated Marshall House in Grandi, alongside Kling and Bang Gallery and Ólafur Elíasson. The new space in the harbour will open with a retrospective exhibition echoing Ólafur´s practice and contribution as one from the young and radical generation of contemporary artists who surfaced during the seventies.

The exhibition will include documentation of his performance work and other substantial material that had not been shared with the public eye during his lifetime and pull together works from The National Gallery of Iceland and Reykjavík Art Museum, along with those in private collection from friends, family, and collectors.

Curators Þorgerður Ólafsdóttir, Director of the Living Art Museum and Collection Manager Becky Forsythe have titled the exhibition Rolling Line, the namesake to a photographic work Ólafur completed in 1975. The artist himself is seen somersaulting through nature within Rolling Line, and the work references the possibility of a continuous line always ending in a circle. This reflection is well related to the core of the exhibition, which aims to shed new light on the process and period of the artist, from 1971 when he started as a student in The Icelandic College of Art and Craft, until the early eighties when Ólafur began to turn away from one of his main mediums, the photograph.

Ólafur Lárusson was born in 1951 and raised in Austur-Meðalholtum, South Iceland and in Hlíðar – 105 Reykjavík. He studied at the Icelandic College of Art and Craft, now Iceland Academy of the Arts, from 1971-74 and subsequently in Haarlem, Holland, where he graduated from Atalier ´63 in 1976. Ólafur was an extremely prolific and productive artist during the seventies and played a key role in shaping the priorities of the icelandic art scene at that time. He was amongst the last artists to be accepted into the SÚM Gallery movement, a founding member of the Living Art Museum, and the first indications of the museum were stored in his studio on Mjölnisholt prior to when the board of Nýló received the facilities at Vatnsstígur 3b in 1980.

The gift from Ólafur´s studio, marks a turning point for Nýló and is also an important addition to art history. The archive is the first of its kind to be accepted by the museum, where light is cast upon the life and practice of the artist in such a way. With the family´s donation, video documentation from Ólafur´s Rainbow performance – which was performed in SÚM Gallery in 1978 and had been lost for many years, has now surfaced. The recording shows the artist breaking hanging glass plates that have been painted the colours of the rainbow, with his head – the broken glass swinging back and forth alongside it.

This contribution also strengthens Nýló´s research into collecting, preserving and archiving performance art, and underlines the immeasurable value of the insight provided through otherwise unseen material gathered over time in the artist´s studio; conceptual-work, the process and evolution of artworks, and specific focuses, streams and remains of certain periods.

Ólafur passed away on December 4th, 2014. On 10th September he would have celebrated his 65th birthday and the museum would like to take this opportunity to acknowledge his contribution to shaping the scene of Icelandic art. To friends and family and Óli – happy birthday!

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Núllið new home to the Icelandic Punk Museum

Sep 09 2016 Published by under Uncategorized

The Living Art Museum would like to wish the new tenants of Núllið, Bankastræti 0, Guðfinnur Sölvi Karlsson, Dr. Gunni, Axel Hallkell Jóhannesson and Þórdís Claessen, administrators of the Icelandic Punk Museum, congratulations with the new space.

The group is now working on the first exhibition that will coincide with the opening of the 2016 Icelandic Airwaves festival. The exhibition intends to trace the history of punk in Iceland and the spirit of the movement through objects and photographs.

According to the foursome the space is not too small and is very well suited to host the exhibition. The museum is a tribute to the punk scene, which has, in their opinion, provided the foundation for the success of Icelandic music.

The Living Art Museum received the keys to the female lavatories at Bankastræti 0 at the year end of 2014 and then began the transformation into an exhibition space in collaboration with the architectural firm kurtogpi. Architect Helgi Sigurðsson designed the lavatories, which were formally opened on the National Holiday, June 17th in 1930. The operations underground were reduced considerably at the turn of the century and the facility was finally closed in the year 2006.

The city of Reykjavík had a large interest in restoring the operations in the space underground, but with a different purpose. The city reached out to the board of the Living Art Museum and invited the museum to take over the space rent-free for a year to install exhibitions underground, with the hope of reviving the space once again.

The lavatories are preserved under the Ministry of Cultural Heritage, which proved to be a considerable challenge for architects Ásmund Hrafn Sturluson and Steinþór Kára Kárason, in working with the preexisting structure, while addressing the new role of the space.

The Living Art Museum´s first exhibition in Núllið opened prior to the completion of the renovations, at Sequences VII Art Festival in April 2015. The construction in the space was completed later during the summer, when the museum´s exhibition programming was continued.

The museum´s exhibitions and events underground were:
Being Boring / Curators Gareth Bell-Jones & Gemma LloydJohn Baldessari, Phil Coy, Lucy Clout, Emma Hart, William Hunt, Sam Porritt and Peter Wächtler

prik/ strik – Kristín Rúnarsdóttir

Nothing Really Matters (except me) Simon Buckley

Coming Soon / Brynjar Helgason, Ívar Glói Gunnarsson, Logi Leó Gunnarsson and Una Björg Magnúsdóttir.

The apparent impossibility of zero / Ragnar Helgi Ólafsson / Sequences VII

Other events included the opening release of Dulkápan or Hidden Covers on Design March, which occupied the space, offering a varied event programme alongside the exhibition.

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Infinite Next – roundtable & artists talk

May 11 2016 Published by under Uncategorized

The Living Art Museum welcomes you to round table discussions and artists talk to coincide with the exhibition Infinite Next which opened 7th May.

The event starts at 8pm, Thursday 12th May in Völvufell 13-21, Breiðholt.

The artists Amy Howden-Chapman, Anna Líndal, Bjarki Bragason, Bryndís Snæbjörnsdóttir and Hildigunnur Birgisdóttir will lead the discussions and take visitors on a tour around the exhibition.

Infinite Next is a group exhibition of works by Anna Líndal, Amy Howden-Chapman, Bjarki Bragason, Bryndís Snæbjörnsdóttir & Mark Wilson, Hildigunnur Birgisdóttir and Pilvi Takala.

Works in the exhibition deal in different ways with systems which all societies struggle with; late-capitalism, ecosystems in degradation, human experiments to alter the environment, knowledge production, manifestations and the effects of humans on the environment.

Each artist will give a short talk about his or her work before continuing around the idea and development of the exhibition.

The discussions will take place in English.

The house will be open from 8 pm with light refreshment

The discussions will start at 8.30 pm, open for the public and no entry fee.

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desiccation

Apr 28 2016 Published by under Uncategorized

Do you have to know when the work begins?
Do you have to know when it is over?
Do you have to know when it fails?
Do you have to know who made it?
Do you have to know who owns it?
Do you have to know from what time it is?
Does it have to be found?
Do I have to decide my own work?

Ásta Ólafsdóttir, The Silence That Headed in a New Direction (1980)

How does one preserve an idea? How do museums face the great challenge that is conserving artwork that was possibly never meant to be conserved? What is the afterlife of artworks that revolve around the process rather than the final product—the journey rather than the destination? Are short-lived artworks less important than those who are intended to stand the test of time and are easily conservable? Some of the works in the exhibition have taken a new form after a long period of storage in the museum’s collection and are troublesome to exhibit in their original context. Are they still the same artworks? Should these types of work be conserved as instruction-based art instead of the idea’s material remains?

What unites the works is the use of mundane materials such as cement, leaves and classic Icelandic food. The process and the idea are given greater weight than the object itself as the final artwork. The hand of the artist is not visible. The forces that form the appearance of the work are natural processes, the laws of physics and the steady hands of the women working at Sláturfélag Suðurlands.

DESICCATION raises questions about the afterlife of conceptual artworks and the importance of conservation and preservation.

Skúlptúr by Kristján Guðmundsson (b. 1941) is a piece of blood pudding that has been pickled in whey, a traditional Icelandic dish. A small card has been attached to a pin and stuck into the pudding and reads: “There’s no use running if you’re going the wrong way,“ a quote by the Norwegian polar explorer Fridtjof Nansen. When exhibited in 1970 it was a part of a group of 26 blood puddings, each with a different quote. It is likely the only piece remaining. They were dispersed around the gallery floor and a sour stench filled the room. After a while the blood pudding desiccated and became petrified. Due to the work’s fragile condition it is impossible to exhibit as it was almost 50 years ago.

Bench #2 is a collaboration by the German artist duo Florian Wojnar (b. 1967) and Nikolai von Rosen (b. 1972). The work was produced for the exhibition CharlieHotelEchoEchoSierraEcho in The Living Art Museum in 2010. The work consists of five sculptures that were cast by pouring water into bags of cement, mixed and allowed to set. The bag embraced the concrete and gave each sculpture a unique appearance. The paper bags were peeled off and voluptuous but lumbering bodies were unveiled and placed on a wooden board, resembling a bench.

Michael Gibbs (b. 1949, d. 2009) exhibited his work Leavings in the Gallery Suðurgata 7 in 1978. Leaves and book pages were scattered on the gallery floor. The title is a play on words referring to leaving something behind and the leaves themselves. Later the artwork was placed in seven plastic bags, each numbered from 1–7. It would be unwise to exhibit Leavings as Gibbs did four decades ago due to the fragile condition of the leaves.

Ásta Ólafsdóttir’s (b. 1948) book is somewhat of a stowaway in the exhibition. Þögnin sem stefndi í nýja átt is not conceptually or materially related to the other works on display but the questions raised in her poetry rhymes with the exhibition’s dilemma. It can also inform the discussion of the objectives of museums and art historical writing.

DESICCATION is curated by Birkir Karlsson and Inga Björk Bjarnadóttir, students in the MA program in art theory at the University of Iceland.

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Nýló, Kling & Bang and Ólafur Elíasson will move into the Marshall house

Jan 29 2016 Published by under Uncategorized

Á fundi borgarráðs í gær var tillagan samþykkt um Marshall húsið út á Granda sem mun hýsa sýningarrými Nýló, Kling og Bang gallerí og vinnustofu og sýningarrými Ólafs Elíassonar. Reykjavíkurborg mun leigja húsið til 15 ára. Á sama tíma verður opnaður veitingastaður á jarðhæð hússins með sérstaka áherslu á sjávarfang.

Hugmyndasmiðir Marshall hússins og hönnuðir eru Ásmundur Hrafn Sturluson og Steinþór Kári Kárason, arkitektar hjá KurtogPi. Samkvæmt Degi B. Eggertssyni, borgarstjóra Reykjavíkur fagnar hann því að samstarf hafi tekist um öfluga starfsemi í Marshall húsinu sem að verður án efa eitt mest spennandi myndlistar- og menningarhús borgarinnar og þó víðar væri leitað.

Árið 1948 hóst bygging síldarverksmiðju í Örfyrisey sem var að hluta fjármögnuð með Marshall aðstoð Bandaríkjanna eftir stríð og er nafn hússins því þaðan komið. Verksmiðjan var í notkun í um hálfa öld en hefur staðið auð undanfarin ár. HB Grandi á húsið og segir Vilhjálmur Vilhjálmsson forstjóri fyrirtækisins að hann hlakki til að hefja framkvæmdir á húsinu og sjá líf færast í það á nýjan leik.

Áform hafa staðið í tvö ár um myndlistarstarfsemi í húsið en hugmyndin kemur til vegna fyrirsjáanlegrar vöntunar í miðbænum á listamannareknum rýmum.

Safneignin sjálf og sú aðstaða sem stjórn og starfsfólk Nýló hefur búið henni í Völvufellinu, mun halda kyrru fyrir í Breiðholtinu en verður opin eftir samkomulagi og þörfum.

Stjórn Nýló mun setja upp tvær sýningar í Núllinu næstkomandi apríl og júní áður en leigusamningnum við Reykjavíkurborg lýkur og eftir það er stefnin tekin út á Granda.

Stjórn og starfsfólk Nýlistasafnsins gleðst vitanlega yfir þessum fréttum! Ljóst er að róðurinn verður áfram þungur og ekki má slá slöku við. En safnið er nú búið að tryggja sér frábært sýningarými í lengri tíma en tíðkast hefur undanfarin 15 ár.

Nýlistasafnið eða Nýló, var stofnað árið 1978 af hópi 27 myndlistarmanna. Nýló er eitt elsta listamannarekna safn og sýningarrými í heiminum, vettvangur uppákoma, umræðna og gjörninga. Nýló hefur lengi verið miðstöð nýrra strauma og tilrauna í íslenskri og erlendri myndlist og hafa margar sýningar í Nýló markað tímamót í íslenskri listasögu. Ár hvert stendur Nýló fyrir öflugri sýningadagskrá auk þess að safna og varðveita listaverk og heimildum sem tengjast frumkvöðlastarfi innan íslenskrar myndlistar.

Kling & Bang gallerí var stofnað af tíu myndlistarmönnum í byrjun árs 2003 og hefur allar götur síðan verið listamannarekið gallerí (non profit). Stefna Kling & Bang er að sýna myndlist sem ögrar samhengi og innihaldi skapandi hugsunar. Það hefur vakið heimsathygli fyrir starfsemi sína og sýningar. Kling & Bang hefur alla tíð lagt áherslu á að bjóða upp á vettvang fyrir framúrskarandi sýningar og tilraunamennsku, jafnt með sýningum upprennandi listamanna og vel þekktra, hérlendra sem erlendra.

Listmaðurinn Ólafur Elíasson er þekktur á heimsvísu, verk hans eru í eigu helstu listasafna heims og eru sýningar hans afar vel sóttar. Uppspretta hugmynda Ólafs er ósjaldan náttúra Íslands, og sú birta og litir sem hér er að finna. Ólafur er með vinnustofur í Berlín og Kaupmannahöfn, en hyggst nú líka vera með aðstöðu í Marshall húsinu ásamt sýningarrými fyrir sérstök verk.

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Double Bind, opening in Vilnius

Oct 15 2015 Published by under Uncategorized

“Double Bind” is an exhibition of new commissions that aims to restore a sense of political agency to private psychological practices associated with personal failure. Starting from depression and looking more widely into emotion economies, we invited artists to fail and be vulnerable.

A confessional tone was assumed by works, architecture and curators alike; a tone regarded as an insurgent force rallying against congealed understandings of psychological pathology and illness and the language of seemingly dispassionate argument in which these are commonly expressed.

What remains as exhibition is un-ordered, multi­-directional and contradictory; a double­-bind, a larde-­arse and unfired clay in the gut.

Excerpt from exhibition text by Maya Tounta

The artist presented in the show are;

Valentina Desideri & Denise Ferreira da Silva
Morten Norbye Halvorsen
Styrmir Örn Guðmundsson
Berglind Jóna
Juha Pekka Matias Laakkonen
Lina Lapelytė
Viktorija Rybakova
Augustas Serapinas

Curated by Maya Tounta and Justė Jonutytė

The project is a collaboration between;
Rupert (Lithuania)
The Academy of Fine Art / KHiO (Norway)
The Living Art Museum (Iceland)

“Double Bind” will also take the form of a lecture series and publication with contributions by Florian Cramer, Travis Jeppesen, Nina Power, Joshua Simon and Marina Vishmidt, as well as workshops in Pabradė and Visaginas with Augustas Serapinas and Felix Gmelin.

The exhibition in Rupert will be open between October 15 – November 11.

More information can be found on www.doublebind.eu and on Rupert’s website: http://www.rupert.lt/

Partner institutions:
http://www.khio.no/Engelsk/
http://www.rupert.lt

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CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS / Deadline 14th June 2015

May 08 2015 Published by under Uncategorized

INFORMATION

The Living Art Museum (Nýló) is not for profit, artist-run museum and a venue for contemporary art with three exhibition and project spaces; The Living Art Museum’s project space, Living Collection and Núllið, Bankastræti 0.

The board of Nýló is committed to promoting critical discourse, progressive practice and experimental work in the field of contemporary art. Also to collect and preserve work by artists exhibiting in the museum, and documents relating to the history of art, focusing on artist initiatives and performance art in Iceland.

The board reserves the right to make final decisions in accepting and declining applications without further explanation.

The board and staff of Nýló will provide curatorial support, installation assistance, design, promotion, documentation and an exhibition catalogue to accompany selected projects.

Submitters are encouraged to seek outside financial assistance independently for their project.

All submissions should have a clear and well developed vision, should indicate which space the proposal considers and a possible date that would be ideal for the project.

The submission deadline is midnight, 14th June 2015.

Hardcopies or submissions arriving after this deadline will not be accepted.

SPACES

The board accepts exhibition and curatorial proposals from artists, artist collectives and curators for the three spaces.

Programme 2015 – 2016
Núllið is located at Bankastræti 0, 101 Reykjavík in the former underground female public lavatories. The facilities have been listed and are protected by the Cultural Heritage Agency of Iceland. Applicants are encouraged to work with the entire space.

Programme 2016
The Living Art Museum’s project space occupies the space where an old bakery once stood and is located above the collection, archive and office space in Völvufell 13, Breiðholt.

The Living Collection space is also located in Völvufell, Breiðholt and was created with the purpose of highlighting works from The Living Art Museum’s collection. All proposals for this space should be in relation to the collection or the archives and/or the history of the museum.

To arrange an appointment and to visit the collection space please contact archive(at)nylo.is

Other information about the Living Art Museum’s collection can be found on the museum’s database – sarpur.is

See floor-plans here:

NullidBankastraeti0

ProjectSpace_Volvufell

LivingCollection_Volvufell

HOW TO APPLY

In preparing your submission please consider the archive of the Living Art Museum’s previous exhibitions – as well as the floorplans to give an indication of the gallery spaces.

All applications must be submitted by midnight on the deadline via email. Hardcopies will not be accepted.

Submissions must include, in the following order:
– Exhibition proposal including technical/ installation needs and requirements (max. 500 words)
– Artist/curatorial statement (max. 300 words)
– Current CV
– Detailed budget plan
– Support material/images (10 max). All images must be labeled with details pertaining to the work, dimensions, media, title and year

The proposal, artist statement, CV, budget and image list should preferable be submitted together as a single PDF attachment, no larger than 8 MB. The support material/10 images may be included separately in another attachment. Microsoft Word documents and submission text in the body of email correspondence will not be accepted.

For sound or time-based submissions, please include a direct link to the content on your website or host page (Vimeo, etc.). Please do not include video files in your email application; only links.

Please send email submissions to applications(at)nylo.is

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The Living Art Museum’s fundraising & auction will be held in the Museum House of Iceland between 19 – 23th November

Nov 10 2014 Published by under Uncategorized

The Living Art Museum or Nýló is one of the oldest artist-run museum and a venue for contemporary visual art in Europe. It is committed to the presentation of work by Icelandic and international artists and to the collecting and preserving of contemporary art.

Nýló is a non-profit association with over 350 professional artists as members, and serves as a collector of works and as a platform for innovative experimental contemporary art.

Since it’s establishment the members have donated artworks to Nýló and today the collection includes around 2.000 works.

Image credit, works donated to the auction
To the left: Time /Pavillion II by Rúrí
To the right: Nordic Soap by Arnar Ásgeirsson

Throughout the years Nýló has had to change location several times because of unstable rental market and financial situation. Members of the Living Art Museum, along with other artists have now donated art works to finance new housing for the museum.

Click here to visit the auction website or on the link to the right.

The fundraising and auction will launch Wednesday 19th of November at 5pm in the Museum House of Iceland, Hverfisgata 15.

In early June 2014 Nýló had to move from its last location at Skúlagata 28, 101 Reykjavík due to highly increased rent. The board decided to move the collection and archives to Völvufell 13-21, efra-Breiðholt, a suburban area in east Reykjavík where the new facilities are devoted to the collection and research. The search for a more permanent exhibition space is ongoing.

The Living Art Museum was founded in 1978 by a group of 26 local artists. The main purpose of founding a new contemporary art museum in Reykjavik at the time was to establish and introduce contemporary art within the local culture scene. Since its establishment Nýló has functioned as a forum of possibilities for both art and reflections on society.

In 2010 Nýló was awarded the prestige Icelandic Museum Awards. The museum is an important platform for research, cross-disciplinary collaboration and critical discourse on contemporary art.

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Alfredo Cramerotti appointed artistic director of Sequences VII 2015

Nov 07 2014 Published by under Uncategorized

Alfredo Cramerotti has been appointed as the next artistic director of Sequences Real Time Art Festival that takes place for the seventh time in Reykjavík, Iceland, April 10-19, 2015.

Sequences is an independent biennial, established in Reykjavík in 2006. The aim of the ten-day festival is to produce and present progressive visual art with special focus on time-based media, such as performance, sonic works, video and public interventions. An offspring of the dynamic art scene that thrives in Reykjavik, Sequences is the first art festival in Iceland to focus on visual arts alone. New artistic directors are hired to reshape each edition of Sequences according to their vision, making it unique and different every time.
Following a successful Sequences VI in 2013, under the artistic leadership of Markús Thór Andrésson, it was decided to cultivate the power of the festival and further its development by seeking abroad for the next artistic director.

The organising bodies and responsible for Sequences are the Icelandic Art Center, The Living Art Museum and Kling&Bang gallery.

Alfredo Cramerotti is a writer and curator working across TV, radio, publishing, media festivals and exhibition making. He directs MOSTYN, Wales’ leading contemporary art institute and co-directs the roaming curatorial agencies AGM Culture and CPS Chamber of Public Secrets. Amongst other major exhibitions, he co-curated the Maldives Pavilion and the Wales Pavilion at the 55th Venice Art Biennale, Italy, in 2013, and Manifesta 8, the European Biennial of Contemporary Art, Region of Murcia, Spain, in 2010. The curatorial and organisational team of Sequences VII is made up of Cramerotti, Edda K. Sigurjónsdóttir, curatorial consultant and project manager and Edda Halldórsdóttir, managing director.

When asked about his interest in curating a visual arts festival in Iceland, Cramerotti said that: “Reykjavik has one of the most active and cutting-edge scenes in contemporary culture. Just notice the presence of Icelandic artists and programmes on a global scale in visual arts, music, digital imaging, theatre, dance, etc. To be able to go through the creative process of discussing themes, inventing formats, commissioning new work, and organising exhibitions, performances, conversations and more in the Iceland art scene is a great opportunity.”

Sequences VII will include approximately 25 artistic positions, from the established to the emergent, from around 10 different countries. The complete list of invited artists, partnerships and the festival theme will be announced soon. Exhibitions, performances and events will take place in various official venues and public spaces across Reykjavík. Alongside the main program, an Off-Venue program – introduced for the first time in the previous edition of Sequences, during which works from Matthew Barney and many more were exhibited – will be presented. Registrations for the Off-Venue program will be welcomed and advertised later.

Sequences is an artist initiated festival and has grown from the grass-root art scene in Iceland. It aims to be a progressive international visual arts event of significance, a valuable platform for artists to develop their practice, further their careers and facilitate increased participation and visibility in the international art scene. About the development of Sequences, Cramerotti said that:

“Sequences has done great things in the past six editions. Sequences VII will have an impact internationally and at the same time a strong local purpose, combining a range of cross-disciplinary works, curatorial approaches and multiple venues in Reykjavik. I am utterly enjoying the process, and looking forward to seeing the results myself. ”

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Finissage S7 – Suðurgata >> Árbær (not in service)

Aug 21 2014 Published by under Uncategorized

The exhibition S7 – Suðurgata >> Árbær (not in service) is coming to an end.

S7 – Suðurgata >> Árbær (not in service) is an exhibition and publication based on the initiative Gallery Suðurgata 7. The initiative, named after its location, ran from 1977 to 1982 in central Reykjavík. Organized by young artists at the time, it hosted a variety of cultural events, art exhibitions, film screenings, concerts and performances and instigated a platform for critical dialogue with the publication of an art magazine, Svart á hvítu (Black on White). The project is an attempt to examine the history of the initiative and its importance as well as to contextualize it in contemporary art and thus shape a new narrative.

The project allows for an otherwise unlikely collaboration between two institutions, the artist-run Living Art Museum and the Reykjavik City Heritage Museum, the collaboration presupposes the project. The Living Art Museum keeps original documents about the gallery in its Archive of Artist-run Initiatives, while the Reykjavík City Museum preserves the building that housed the gallery in Árbær Open Air Museum, to which it was relocated in 1983.

Four emerging artists, Erla Silfá Þorgrímsdóttir, Hrafnhildur Helgadóttir, Sæmundur Þór Helgason and Styrmir Örn Guðmunsson, were invited to present site-specific work in three rooms of the building in Árbæjarsafn, and react to the multi-layered history of the building, its architecture and its museological context.

In addition, individual works by artists Anna Hrund Másdóttir, Arna Óttarsdóttir, Arnar Ásgeirsson and Leifur Ýmir Eyjólfsson were chosen to reflect on the staged period-rooms installed in other rooms of the building.

The project is a collaboration between the Reykjavík Art Festival, The Living Art Museum and the Reykjavík City Museum.

Live music improvisation for paintings

You are cordially invited to a live music improvisation on Sunday 24th August at 4pm on Lækjargata in Árbæjarsafn, Reykjavík City Museum. The performance is a part of Hrafnhildur Helgadóttir’s piece were the artist herself chose three paintings by three artists from the Living Art Museum’s collection and collaborated with musicians to play an improvisation. The paintings improvised are by Ásta Ólafsdóttir, Árni Ingólfsson and Kees Visser.

The performance is in collaboration with Úsland, a leading recording and publishing company in Iceland.

Admission is Free on Sunday
The exhibition is open until 31st of August.

For further information;
http://uslandrecords.bandcamp.com/
www.hrafnhildurhelgadottir.info

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Opening of S7 – Suðurgata >> Árbær (not in service)

May 27 2014 Published by under Uncategorized

You are cordially invited to the opening in Árbæjarsafn, Friday, May 30th at 5pm.

Erla Silfá Þorgrímsdóttir, Hrafnhildur Helgadóttir, Sæmundur Þór Helgason & Styrmir Örn Guðmundsson. Anna Hrund Másdóttir, Arna Óttarsdóttir, Arnar Ásgeirsson & Leifur Ýmir Eyjólfsson.

The exhibition and publication that is also being celebrated on this day, derives its contents and inspiration from the artist-run Gallery Suðurgata 7 that ran in Reykjavik´s center from 1977-1982 and now stands in Árbæjarsafn. The gallery group consisted of emerging artists and during its time left a significant impact on the local art scene with its dynamic program and the publication of the art-magazine Svart á hvítu [Black on White]

Four emerging artists have now been invited to show their work for the exhibition; Erla Silfá Þorgrímsdóttir, Hrafnhildur Helgadóttir, Sæmundur Þór Helgason and Styrmir Örn Guðmundsson, using site-specific emphasis. Four additional artists have also been selected to infiltrate the historical displays that precede the exhibition in the museum, Anna Hrund Másdóttir, Arna Óttarsdóttir, Arnar Ásgeirsson and Leifur Ýmir Eyjólfsson.

The project creates a point where two dissimilar institutions are able to meet, the Living Art Museum and the Reykjavík City Museum. The former keeps documents correlating to the history of Gallery Suðurgata 7 in its Archive of Artist Initiatives, while the latter preserves the building itself, relocated in one piece in 1983 to Árbæjarsafn, where its history dating back to the turn of the century is laid out.
The project is done in association with the Reykjavik Arts festival.

Duration 31st May – 31st August

Curators Unnar Örn Jónsson & Heiðar Kári Rannversson

Project management Gunnhildur Hauksdóttir & Bergsveinn Þórsson

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Time and Time and Again during Reykjavík Arts Festival

May 22 2014 Published by under Uncategorized

The exhibition and movie Time and Time and Again is part of Reykjavík Arts Festival 2014. During the festival a programme of performance and video works will be held at the museum and a new video by Hreinn will be added to the exhibition.

Thursday 22 May a video work by Hreinn Friðfinnsson, Correspondance in Red and Green, will be added to the exhibition at the Living Art Museum in Skúlagata 28, 101 Reykjavík.

Saturday 31 May 17:00 Programme of a happening by Magnús Logi Kristinsson, one of the three characters in the movie, with additional new video works by Hreinn. Magnús Logi lives and works in Finland and will visit Reykjavík during the festival.

Thursday 5 June 20:00 – Finisage. Lecture and discussion on the film and exhibition Time and Time and Again. Participants will be Ingibjörg Magnadóttir, Oddný Eir Ævarsdóttir and Huldar Breiðfjörð.

The film Time and Time and Again reflects the life and art of Hreinn Friðfinnsson, one of his generation’s most admired artists.
In this fifty-minute film, the directors, Ragnheiður Gestsdóttir and Markús Þór Andrésson, approach the subject in an unconventional way, where the borders between reality and fiction are dissolved. Key works from the artist’s career are used as inspiration for an exciting narrative where science’s search for truth and the urge to create are set against one another. The film is shown at hourly intervals in its own special space at the Living Art Museum, and an exhibition of works by the artist is in the main gallery.

The exhibition reflects the artist’s complex experiments in handling impermanence and capturing infinity in time and space. The exhibition comprises both older works which have not been publicly displayed for many years as well as other more well-known pieces. In addition, brand new pieces will be exhibited, especially created for the Living Art Museum’s unique tiled floor. The museum itself plays a large part in the film as some of it was shot in its storage areas.

Kati Outinen, the highly acclaimed Finnish actress, plays the part of Aika, who works at the Time Laboratory. It is her job to oversee the progress of experiments where, in their youth, twin brothers were moved to differing locations in order to measure the progress of time in conjunction with the proximity of the Earth’s gravity.

Magnús Logi Kristinsson plays the brother who was raised high in the mountains of Iceland, while Hreinn Friðfinnsson himself plays the twin who was brought up by the sea in Amsterdam. The experiment far exceeds expectations as it seems that decades separate the brothers. A problem arises when Aika decides to bring the twins together for the first time, as Time is unpredictable.

The exhibition Time and Time and Again at the Living Art Museum is from 5 April – 5 June and is the last exhibition at Skúlagata 28, 101 Reykjavík.

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The Living Art Museum will move its collection to 111 Reykjavík

May 21 2014 Published by under Uncategorized

The Living Art Museum will move its collection and archives to a new location by the end of May 2014.

The board will announce new opening hours as soon as the moving has been completed.

The new facilities are in Völvufell 13-21, 111 – the upper east side of Reykjavík, Breiðholtið, and consist of 400m2 space in the vicinities of the local swimming pool, Breiðholt College and Fab Lab Innovative Centre.

Over the next years the museum will store the collection in Breiðholtið, which comprises around 2,000 works, along with the main archives: the Archive of Nýló, the Archive of Artist-Run Initiatives and the Performance Archives.

The board will put up two exhibitions per year, with works from the collection and provide guided tours about the museum and collection. Nýló will also provide a research and study room for those committed to specific projects concerning the museum.

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New director

Mar 14 2014 Published by under Uncategorized

Þorgerður Ólafsdóttir was elected director of the board March 1st at the annual meeting of the Living Art Museum in Skúlagata 28, 101 Reykjavík.

Þorgerður Ólafsdóttir (1985) graduated with a Master of Fine Art from the Glasgow School of Art in the spring 2013, after receiving her Bachelor of Fine Art from the Iceland Academy of Arts in 2009.

Olafsdottir has been a practicing artist since 2009 and has exhibited her work both nationally and internationally. After graduating in 2009 from IAA she co-established Crymo gallery, an artist-run space where she organized the exhibition programme along with publishing the book, Trust us! We are artists, which outlined the grassroots scene in Reykjavík after the economic crisis in Iceland. 

Olafsdottir was the director of Sequences Art Festival in 2011 and has been involved with the development of the festival since.

In 2013 Olafsdóttir established the biannual art project Staðir/Places in the Westfjords of Iceland, together with artist Eva Isleifsdóttir.

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time and time and again

Mar 10 2014 Published by under Uncategorized

An exhibition of works by Hreinn Friðfinnsson curated by Markús Þór Andrésson and Ragnheiður Gestsdóttir. The exhibition and associated programme are part of the Reykjavík Arts Festival.

The exhibition consists of works by Hreinn and a film of his life and art directed by Ragnheiður and Markús: Time and Time and Again. Significant works from the artist’s career and elements of his biography are used as the backbone for a thrilling narrative involving the struggle between science’s search for the truth and the creative longing of art.

The acclaimed Finnish actress Kati Outinen plays the part of Aika, who works at The Laboratory of Time. She has the task of monitoring the progress of an experiment in which twin brothers were sent to different places when they were young in order to measure the effect of time in relation to proximity to the earth’s gravity. Magnús Logi Kristinsson plays the role of the brother who grew up high in the Icelandic mountains and Hreinn Friðfinnsson himself plays the other brother, who grew up at sea level in Amsterdam. The experiment far exceeds expectations as decades appear to divide the brothers. Problems arise when Aika decides to bring them together for the first time, as time proves to be a great deceiver. The fifty-minute film will be shown hourly at The Living Art Museum, while in the main room there will be an exhibition of Hreinn’s work.

The exhibition reflects Hreinn Friðfinnsson’s complex attempts to deal with ephemerality and to capture the infinity of time and space. In the exhibition, older pieces which haven’t been displayed in public for many years are combined with better known works from the artist’s career.

In addition, there will be a display of brand new work by the artist, which incorporates the unique tiled floor in The Living Art Museum on Skúlagata. The museum itself also plays a major role in the film and parts of it were shot in its collection storage.

A further dimension will be added to the exhibition at the Reykjavík Arts Festival in May. The artist Magnús Logi Kristinsson – who plays one of the three characters in the film – will put on a performance, there will be a special screening of Hreinn’s recent video work, and there will be a seminar about his work and the new film. In addition, Hreinn will premiere a new video work that came about during the making of the film and which can be viewed as a response to the process.

Further information about performance, video program and seminar will be announced at a later date.

Click here to see a trailer of the film: https://vimeo.com/33776222

The exhibition Time and Time and Again will be at The Living Art Museum 5 April – 5 June.

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Visit us

Address

  • The Living Art Museum
  • The Marshall House
  • Grandagarður 20
  • 101 Reykjavík
  • Iceland

Opening hours

  • Tue to Sun 12 – 18
  • Thu 12 – 21
  • Closed on Mondays

Public Transportation

  • Bus number: 14
  • Stop: Grandi

Contact

  • T: +354 551 4350
  • E: nylo(at)nylo.is

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